4 Health Benefits of Oats

Jumping on the organic food bandwagon? Then you’re probably no stranger to oats. Oats have numerous health benefits which have made it a popular choice for home remedies for skin care and other beauty tips as well.

Asian cuisines and recipes are some of the most frequent users of oats and know how to make them more delicious. Even your pets, if you have dogs and cats, can benefit from oats!

What are oats?

Oats are probably the most famous breakfast choice because they’re one the healthiest breakfast option available. Lots of studies have shown that oats and oatmeal have a positive impact on your health.

If it wasn’t already too obvious, oats are a whole grain food that makes oatmeal. The best kind of oats to cook are the ones which are either rolled or crushed since they take less time to cook.

How to eat oats?

Cooked oats are also commonly known as porridge. The simplest way to make them is by boiling them in water or milk, according to your dietary requirement or personal preference. They can also be made overnight. Honey can be added to sweeten them naturally and a dash of cinnamon adds flavor.

Some popular toppings on oatmeal include bananas, blueberries, strawberries, goji berries, almonds, walnuts etc. Oatmeal cookies are also very popular amongst those who prefer healthier choices.

1.     High in nutrition

Oats are very well balanced when it comes to the nutritional composition. They are rich and abundant in essential carbohydrates and fiber and contain a fiber known as beta-glucan. They are packed with high protein and antioxidants such as zinc, magnesium and copper.

2.     They lower cholesterol levels

High blood cholesterol can lead to heart diseases. There has been ample research on the effects of beta-glucan fiber on reducing total and LDL cholesterol levels. This fiber increases the excretion of bile which is rich in cholesterol, which automatically regulates the levels of cholesterol in the blood.

It also prevents LDL cholesterol from oxidizing too fast which reduces the risk of inflammation in the arteries and tissue damage.

3.     Improves blood sugar control

High blood sugar can cause type 2 diabetes to develop because the body develops a resistance to the hormone insulin. People who tend to be overweight or have been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes can benefit from eating oatmeal regularly. It also helps to improve insulin sensitivity.

4.     Oatmeal helps to lose weight

Oatmeal tends to fill you up for longer periods. Having a bowl of oatmeal first thing in the morning gives your body the signal that it’s full even though you consume fewer calories. This reduces your urge to eat other junk foods throughout the day.

 

All kinds of organic oats are available at SF Mart. For those willing to incorporate healthy foods in their lifestyle, you can start with oats. Order them online on their website and start eating healthy from today!

12 Amazing Benefits Of Kidney Beans And Recipes

One of the many varieties of beans, kidney beans are distinctive in their shape and color. They derive their name from their shape, similar to a kidney, and they are also red in color (in most cases). Considered a varietal of the common bean, which is scientifically known as Phaseolus vulgaris, kidney beans are most frequently found in chili, a spicy stew, all around the world and is particularly popular in regions of India and throughout Central America. Kidney beans come in various types including white kidney beans, red kidney beans, and lightly speckled kidney beans. You may also find them in striped, mottled, cream, purple and even black varieties.

Kidney Beans Nutrition

Like many other types of beans, kidney beans are densely packed with nutrients that are critical to our health, which explains why they are a staple food in many cultural cuisines. [1] For a relatively low cost, kidney beans can provide significant levels of dietary fiber, folate, phosphoruscopperproteinironmagnesiumpotassium, molybdenum and vitamin B1. A single cup of these beans represents at least 20% of your daily requirement for these nutrients; for some of these essential minerals and vitamins, it delivers more than 40% of the daily suggestion. The diverse range of nutrients naturally leads to an impressive list of health effects that these beans can provide.

Health Benefits of Kidney Beans

The most notable health benefits of kidney beans include their ability to detoxify the body, improve digestion, lower blood pressure, lower cholesterol levels, increase muscle mass, prevent diabetes, boost circulation, reduce birth defect risk, stimulate the immune system, aid vision health, promote strong bones, support energy levels and strengthen cognitive health, among others.

Control Diabetes

The high level of dietary fiber found in kidney beans is great for people looking to control their diabetes or lower its risk. High-fiber foods can regulate the amount of blood sugar and insulin in the body, helping to reduce the dangers of spikes and drops in glucose and stabilize energy levels. [2]

Lower Cholesterol Levels

Another major benefit of the dietary fiber in kidney beans is its ability to lower LDL cholesterol levels and reduce the risk of coronary heartdiseases. [3] By providing a healthy balance to cholesterol, kidney beans can help lower your chances of developing atherosclerosis and suffering a heart attack.

Prevent Birth Defects

A single cup of kidney beans provides more than half of the recommended amount of folate in the body. Folic acid’s most notable benefit is that it can reduce the risk of neural tube defects in infants, which makes it a critical nutrient for expecting mothers. [4]

Promote Muscle Growth

Kidney beans are one of the best sources of plant protein that you can add to your diet, as a single cup offers nearly 15 grams of protein. Lean protein breaks down into crucial amino acids that are used for energy production and the growth of muscle tissue, so if you are trying to bulk up and burn fat, kidney bean-filled foods are an excellent option. [5]

Boost Immune System

Although the amount of vitamin C is not as high as in other vegetables or fruits, it does contain more than 10% of your daily recommendation in each cup of kidney beans. [6] This can stimulate the immune system and promote the production of white blood cells, which are the body’s first line of defense against foreign pathogens. It is also critical for collagen production and thus helps repair processes throughout the body.

Eye Care

Boasting a high level of beta-carotene, which breaks down into vitamin A, kidney beans are known for their impact on vision health. [7] Vitamin A specifically targets oxidative stress in the retina, helping to prevent the occurrence of macular degeneration and the development of cataracts.

Lower Blood Pressure

1 cup of kidney beans holds approximately 20% of your daily recommended amount of potassium, which is a critical vasodilator that can boost heart health. By reducing the amount of strain on the cardiovascular system and relaxing blood vessels and arteries, potassium helps to lower the risk of heart attack, stroke, and coronary heart disease. [8]

Boost Circulation

There is an impressive amount of iron in kidney beans, with more than 20% of your daily recommended amount. [9] Iron is a key component in the production of red blood cells, so a diet high in kidney beans will boost circulation and cardiovascular health, while also increasing energy levels and delivering oxygen to extremities and areas of the body that need resources the most.

Increase Bone Mineral Density

The list of minerals found in kidney beans includes phosphorus, magnesium, copper, and manganese, all of which play a role in bone mineral density. [10] Increasing your mineral uptake will lower your risk of developing osteoporosis, keeping you strong and active as you age.

Stimulate Energy Production

Manganese is an easily overlooked mineral but it plays dozens of key roles in the body, including the production of enzymes that are involved in energy production and mitochondrial function. [11] This means more accessible energy in the body if you add these beans to your daily or weekly diet.

Lower Cognitive Decline

Neurodegenerative diseases come in many forms, but when it comes to preventing memory loss, thiamin has been heavily researched. Kidney beans possess high levels of this vitamin (B1), making it an ally for people as they age, particularly if they are at risk of cognitive decline or suffer from high levels of oxidative stress. [12]

Improve Digestion

The most well-known health benefit of kidney beans is the impact it can have on digestion. Dietary fiber is able to stimulate the production of gastric juices and promote peristaltic motion, which keeps the bowels moving normally. [13] Regular consumption of these fiber-rich beans can help prevent symptoms of constipation and bloating, while also lowering your risk of hemorrhoids and ulcers.

May Help Prevent Cancer

Kidney beans are rich in fiber, which is considered an important nutrient when it comes to preventing cancer. A 2018 study by Cancer Prevention Institute of California and Stanford University suggests that bean fiber, beans, and grains help in reducing the risk of hormone receptor‐negative breast cancer. [14]

White kidney beans are also found to be rich in lectin, which shows anti-proliferative properties. [15]

Research also suggests that kidney beans are able to induce apoptosis and hence, increase the death of cancer cells. [16]

Recipes for Kidney Beans

There are countless ways to add kidney beans to your diet but some of the best recipes include kidney bean curry and turkey chili.

Kidney Bean Curry

Ingredients:

Step 1 – Heat a saucepan, add vegetable oil and sauté sliced onion for 6-8 minutes.

Step 2 – Add the garlic and coriander and cook for 2-3 minutes.

Step 3 – Add the spices and stir thoroughly for 1 minute.

Step 4 – Add the tomatoes and kidney beans and bring the mixture to a boil.

Step 5 – Lower heat and simmer for 15-20 minutes until the curry is thick.

Step 6 – Pour the curry over the cooked basmati rice, serve and enjoy!

Turkey Chili

Ingredients:

Step 1 – Cook the ground turkey in a pot until browned.

Step 2 – Add the onion and heat until it becomes translucent.

Step 3 – Add 1-2 cups of water to the mixture.

Step 4 – Add all other ingredients, including spices to taste.

Step 5 – Bring the mixture to a boil and then lower to a simmer.

Step 6 – Continue heating for 30-40 minutes on low heat.

Step 7 – Serve hot and enjoy!

Organic Grain is available to purchase at SFMart.com

This article is originally posted on Organic Facts

9 Health Benefits of Eating Whole Grains

Whole grains have been a part of the human diet for tens of thousands of years (1).

But proponents of many modern diets, such as the paleo diet, claim that eating grains is bad for your health.

While a high intake of refined grains is linked to health problems like obesity and inflammation, whole grains are a different story.

In fact, eating whole grains is associated with various benefits, including a lower risk of diabetes, heart disease, and high blood pressure.

Here are the top 9 health benefits of eating whole grains.

Benefits of Whole GrainsShare on Pinterest
What are whole grains?

Grains are the seeds of grass-like plants called cereals. Some of the most common varieties are corn, rice, and wheat.

Some seeds of non-grass plants, or pseudocereals, are also considered whole grains, including buckwheat, quinoa, and amaranth.

Whole-grain kernels have three parts (2):

  • Bran. This is the hard, outer shell. It contains fiber, minerals, and antioxidants.
  • Endosperm. The middle layer of the grain is mostly made up of carbs.
  • Germ. This inner layer has vitamins, minerals, protein, and plant compounds.

Grains can be rolled, crushed, or cracked. Nonetheless, as long as these three parts are present in their original proportion, they’re considered whole grains.

Refined grains have had the germ and bran removed, leaving only the endosperm.

Though enriched refined grains have had some vitamins and minerals added back, they’re still not as healthy or nutritious as the whole versions.

Common varieties of whole grains include:

  • oatmeal
  • popcorn
  • millet
  • quinoa
  • brown rice
  • whole rye
  • wild rice
  • wheat berry
  • bulgur
  • buckwheat
  • freekeh
  • barley
  • sorghum

Products made from these foods are considered whole grain. These include certain types of bread, pasta, and breakfast cereals.

When you purchase processed whole-grain products, read the ingredient list to make sure they’re made entirely from whole grains, not a mixture of whole and refined grains.

Also, keep an eye on the sugar content, especially in the case of breakfast cereals, which are often loaded with added sugar. Seeing “whole grain” on the packaging does not automatically mean that the product is healthy.

SUMMARYWhole grains contain all three parts of the grain. There are many different kinds, including whole wheat and whole corn, oats, brown rice, and quinoa.

1. High in nutrients and fiber

Whole grains deliver many important nutrients. These include:

  • Fiber. The bran provides most of the fiber in whole grains.
  • Vitamins. Whole grains are particularly high in B vitamins, including niacin, thiamine, and folate (34).
  • Minerals. They also contain a good amount of minerals, such as zinc, iron, magnesium, and manganese.
  • Protein. Whole grains boast several grams of protein per serving.
  • Antioxidants. Many compounds in whole grains act as antioxidants. These include phytic acid, lignans, ferulic acid, and sulfur compounds (5).
  • Plant compounds. Whole grains deliver many types of plant compounds that play a role in preventing disease. These include polyphenols, stanols, and sterols (6).

The exact amounts of these nutrients depend on the type of grain.

Nevertheless, to give you a sense of their nutritional profile, here are the key nutrients in 1 ounce (28 grams) of dry oats (4):

  • Fiber: 3 grams
  • Manganese: 69% of the Reference Daily Intake (RDI)
  • Phosphorous: 15% of the RDI
  • Thiamine: 14% of the RDI
  • Magnesium: 12% of the RDI
  • Copper: 9% of the RDI
  • Zinc and iron: 7% of the RDI

SUMMARYWhole grains deliver a variety of important nutrients, including vitamins, minerals, protein, fiber, and other healthy plant compounds.

2. Lower your risk of heart disease

One of the biggest health benefits of whole grains is that they lower your risk of heart disease, which is the leading cause of death worldwide (7).

A review of 10 studies found that three 1-ounce (28-gram) servings of whole grains daily may lower your risk of heart disease by 22% (8).

Similarly, a 10-year study in 17,424 adults observed that those who ate the highest proportion of whole grains in relation to their total carb intake had a 47% lower risk of heart disease (9).

Researchers concluded that heart-healthy diets should include more whole grains and fewer refined grains.

Most studies lump together different types of whole grains, making it hard to separate the benefits of individual foods.

Still, whole-grain breads and cereals, as well as added bran, have been specifically linked to reduced heart disease risk (8).

SUMMARYEating whole grains may lower your risk of heart disease, especially when they replace refined grains.

3. Lower your risk of stroke

Whole grains may also help lower your risk of stroke (10).

In an analysis of 6 studies in nearly 250,000 people, those eating the most whole grains had a 14% lower risk of stroke than those eating the fewest (10).

Furthermore, certain compounds in whole grains, such as fiber, vitamin K, and antioxidants, can reduce your risk of stroke.

Whole grains are also recommended in the DASH and Mediterranean diets, both of which may help lower your risk of stroke (11).

SUMMARYAs part of a heart-healthy diet, whole grains may help lower your risk of stroke.

4. Reduce your risk of obesity

Eating fiber-rich foods can help fill you up and prevent overeating. This is one reason high-fiber diets are recommended for weight loss (5).

Whole grains and products made from them are more filling than refined grains, and research suggests that they may lower your risk of obesity.

In fact, eating 3 servings of whole grains daily was linked to lower body mass index (BMI) and less belly fat in a review of 15 studies in almost 120,000 people (12).

Another study reviewing research from 1965 to 2010 found that whole-grain cereal and cereal with added bran were associated with a modestly lower risk of obesity (13).

SUMMARYDecades of research suggest that whole grains are linked to a lower risk of obesity.

5. Lower your risk of type 2 diabetes

Eating whole in place of refined grains may lower your risk of type 2 diabetes (14).

A review of 16 studies concluded that replacing refined grains with whole varieties and eating at least 2 servings of whole grains daily could lower your risk of diabetes (15).

In part, this is because fiber-rich whole grains can also help with weight control and prevent obesity, a risk factor for diabetes (16).

Moreover, studies have linked whole grain intake to lower fasting blood sugar levels and improved insulin sensitivity (17).

This could be due to magnesium, a mineral found in whole grains that helps your body metabolize carbs and is tied to insulin sensitivity (16).

SUMMARYFiber and magnesium are two nutrients in whole grains that help lower your risk of type 2 diabetes.

6. Support healthy digestion

The fiber in whole grains can support healthy digestion in various ways.

First, fiber helps give bulk to stools and lowers your risk of constipation.

Second, some types of fiber in grains act as prebiotics. This means they help feed your beneficial gut bacteria, which are important for digestive health (518).

SUMMARYDue to their fiber content, whole grains help support healthy digestion by giving bulk to stools and feeding your beneficial gut bacteria.

7. Reduce chronic inflammation

Inflammation is at the root of many chronic diseases.

Some evidence suggests that whole grains can help reduce inflammation (19).

In one study, women who ate the most whole grains were least likely to die from inflammation-related chronic conditions (20).

What’s more, in a recent study, people with unhealthy diets replaced refined wheat products with whole wheat products and saw a reduction in inflammatory markers (21).

The results of these and other studies support public health recommendations to replace most refined grains with whole grains (22).

SUMMARYEating whole grains regularly could help lower inflammation, a key factor in many chronic diseases.

8. May reduce your risk of cancer

Research on whole grains and cancer risk have provided mixed results, though they show promise.

In one review of 20 studies, 6 showed a reduced risk of cancer, while 14 indicated no link (23).

Current research suggests that whole grains’ strongest anticancer benefits are against colorectal cancer, one of the most common types of cancer (2425).

Additionally, some health benefits linked to fiber may help lower your risk of cancer. These include its role as a prebiotic (242627).

Lastly, other components of whole grains, including phytic acid, phenolic acids, and saponins, may slow the development of cancer (24).

SUMMARYWhole grains may help prevent colorectal cancer, one of the most common types of cancer. Still, research on whole grains’ anticancer effects is mixed.

9. Linked to a reduced risk of premature death

When your risk of chronic disease is reduced, your risk of dying prematurely also goes down.

In fact, one study suggested that whole grain intake specifically lowered the risk of dying from heart disease, as well as any other cause (28).

The study used data from two large cohort studies, adjusting for other factors likely to influence death rates, such as smoking, body weight, and overall eating patterns.

Results indicated that every 1-ounce (28-gram) serving of whole grains was linked to a 5% lower risk of death (28).

SUMMARYWhole grains are linked to a lower risk of dying prematurely from any cause.

Whole grains are not for everyone

While whole grains are healthy for most people, they may not be appropriate for all people at all times.

Celiac disease and gluten sensitivity

Wheat, barley, and rye contain gluten, a type of protein that some people are intolerant or allergic to.

Having a gluten allergy, celiac disease, or gluten sensitivity can cause a range of symptoms, including fatigue, indigestion, and joint pain.

Gluten-free whole grains, including buckwheat, rice, oats, and amaranth, are fine for most people with these conditions.

However, some have difficulty tolerating any type of grain and experience digestive distress and other symptoms.

Irritable bowel syndrome

Some grains, such as wheat, are high in short-chain carbohydrates called FODMAPs. These can cause symptoms in people with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), which is very common.

SUMMARYSome people have difficulty tolerating grains. The most well-known issue is gluten, which affects people with gluten allergy, celiac disease, or gluten sensitivity.

How to incorporate whole grains into your diet

You can incorporate whole grains into your diet in many ways.

Perhaps the simplest thing to do is to find whole-grain alternatives to refined grains in your diet.

For instance, if white pasta is a staple in your pantry, replace it with a 100% whole-wheat or other whole-grain pasta. Do the same for breads and cereals.

Be sure to read the ingredient list to see if a product is made from whole grains.

Look for the word “whole” in front of types of grains. If it simply says “wheat” instead of “whole wheat,” it’s not whole.

You can also experiment with new whole grains that you may not have tried before, such as quinoa.

Here are some ideas for adding whole grains to your diet:

  • Make a cooked porridge out of oatmeal or other grains.
  • Sprinkle toasted buckwheat groats on cereal or yogurt.
  • Snack on air-popped popcorn.
  • Make polenta out of whole-grain cornmeal.
  • Swap out white rice with brown rice, or for a different whole grain like quinoa or farro.
  • Add barley to vegetable soups.
  • Try using whole-grain flours, such as whole-wheat pastry flour, in baking.
  • Use stone-ground corn tortillas rather than white tortillas in tacos.

SUMMARYThere are many ways to work whole grains into your diet. Replacing refined grains with whole grains is a good place to start.

The bottom line

Whole grains deliver a variety of health benefits.

Regularly eating whole grains may reduce your risk of heart disease, type 2 diabetes, and obesity. This is particularly true when they replace the refined grains in your diet.

High-fiber foods like whole grains also significantly improve your digestive health, though people with gluten intolerance must avoid wheat, barley, and rye.

For improved health and longevity, consider adding whole grains to your diet every day. Healthy, whole-grain breakfast cereals, such as steel-cut oatmeal, are a popular choice.

Organic Grain is available to purchase at SFMart.com

This article is originally posted on Health Line